cannedviennasausage:

mollystormjackson:

I will always and forever be fascinated by customer’s weird gender hangups. 

(on tapastic)

 (via sleepingjuliette)

"Do you consider yourself a feminist?"
“I don’t really think about things as guys versus girls. I never have. I was raised by parents who brought me up to think if you work as hard as guys, you can go far in life.”

- Taylor Swift 2012

"As a teenager, I didn’t understand that saying you’re a feminist is just saying that you hope women and men will have equal rights and equal opportunities. What it seemed to me, the way it was phrased in culture, society, was that you hate men. And now, I think a lot of girls have had a feminist awakening because they understand what the word means."

- Taylor Swift 2014

— (via valleyfair)

Ruins of Middle Earth in the Fourth Age

askmiddlearth:

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So many ruins. Like, so many. Below you’ll see a map of the major ruins mentioned in Tolkien’s stories - I wasn’t sure if you were only interested in ruins in/near Dunland, so I just went for broke, lol:

Elvish Ruins (Green)

  • Amon Lanc (aka Dol Guldur): When Oropher and his group of Sindarin friends moved to Greenwood/Mirkwood early in the Second Age, this was their capital. They later abandoned it and moved further north in the forest, and by the mid Third Age Amon Lanc had been overrun by Sauron’s servants and renamed Dol Guldur. It was emptied during the War of the Ring, so in the Fourth Age it would basically be elvish ruins (Sindarin/Silvan influence) with a special side-helping of evil.
  • Edhellond: Located in southern Gondor, this was an elvish (mainly Sindarin/Silvan) port/haven during the Second Age and early Third Age. It’s possible that there aren’t actual ruins - perhaps the people of Dol Amroth actually live within the ruins themselves - but it is a possibility.
  • Eregion: This once-great Noldorin realm west of Moria was destroyed during the Second Age. The region is later called Hollin, but we know that it still contains many ruins from the previous elvish inhabitants. Of special interest would be the ruined city of Ost-in-Edhil, which would probably still show some fantastic (Noldorin) elvish ruins along with a fair amount of dwarvish influence, thanks to Eregion’s close relationship with Moria.
  • Lindon and the Western Isles: Now, we don’t actually know anything about ruins in Lindon. But since its population has been steadily decreasing for thousands of years, I’d bet that there must be some abandoned settlements/ruins there by the Fourth Age. And, if your Dunlendings are willing to brave the sea, they could sail just a bit west until they arrived at one of the Western Isles. Himling/Himring should still house the ruins of Maedhros’s fortress from the First Age. You could even try Tol Fuin, a bit further west, which would probably contain some ruins from the men of Dorthonion (the House of Beor), also from the First Age.)

Dwarvish Ruins (Purple)

  • Moria: I think we’re all pretty familiar with these ruins - at some point during the Fourth Age Moria is reclaimed by the dwarves, but since we don’t know when exactly, it could be that your Dunlendings are exploring the ruins while they’re still technically inhabited by orcs.
  • Mount Gundabad: During the First Age this was a location of great significance for the dwarves, and it’s said that delegates from the seven clans would meet here to stay in contact, share news, etc. It was later overrun by orcs when Angmar rose to power, but by the Fourth Age there was a very small population left there. There you could expect to find very old dwarvish ruins, with the influence of the orcs that had been living there for over a thousand years.
  • Grey Mountains: We know that, during the Third Age, several dwarvish mansions were built and and inevitably destroyed by dragons in the Grey Mountains. So I’m sure there are plenty of dwarvish ruins up there.
  • The Blue Mountains: Somewhere in the Blue Mountains are the very ruined remains of the great First Age realms of Nogrod and Belegost. But there are also some smaller abandoned mines and such (especially in the northern Blue Mountains) that are probably more explorer-friendly.

Mannish Ruins

  • Arnor: The entire northern part of Eriador is basically one giant ruin, being the location of the lost realm of Arnor. And while King Elessar begins rebuilding the northern kingdom in the Fourth Age, there would still be plenty of ruins to explore. Such as the ruined city of Annuminas on the shores of Lake Nenuial; the ruined city of Fornost, east of Annuminas; the ruined tower of Amon Sul (commonly known as Weathertop); the Barrow Downs (not only ruins from Arnor, but also even older ruins from the indigenous people who lived there during the Second Age); and the White Towers far to the west (a series of towers built by Elendil at the end of the Second Age - the surrounding area was made part of the Shire by Aragorn, but the towers themselves still remain.)
  • Gondor: Arnor’s southern sibling has its own ruins. Though technically part of Rohan now, Isengard and its tower of Orthanc was actually built by the men of Gondor during the early Third Age. It’s probably one of the most recent ruins, having been destroyed during the War of the Ring by the ents. To the east you’d find some ruins along the shores of Nen Hithoel - the lake above the Falls of Rauros. This was traditionally the northern border of Gondor, and some ruins remain there from it’s glory days. Specifically the fortified hills of Amon Hen and Amon Lhaw (and the nearby Argonath, of course.) Finally, it’s unclear how quickly Osgiliath was rebuilt in the Fourth Age, so you might be able to explore those ruins as well.
  • Enedwaith: People actually live in this region (mainly Dunlendings, actually), but there are also a couple old Numenorean ruins to be found there as well. At the mouth of the Gwathlo you’d find the Second Age ruins of Lond Daer (aka Vinyalonde), the first port/permanent settlement built by Numenoreans in Middle Earth. Further north up the river you’d find the ruined city of Tharbad. Originally a Numenorean outpost, it was later expanded by Gondor and Arnor, until it was ultimately depopulated and abandoned during the Great Plague in the Third Age.
  • Harad/South: Who knows what’s in Harad, honestly. But I can tell you that Umbar, a coastal region within Harad, was a Numenorean stronghold in the later Second Age, and so might contain some Numenorean ruins. And Harondor was actually part of Gondor during the kingdom’s peak. Even though the area was re-taken by the Haradrim, there might be some ruins/Gondorian influence remaining there.

Evil Ruins (Red)

  • Carn Dum: The capital of Angmar, the kingdom ruled by the Witch King in the Third Age. It’s unclear what the ruins would look like - the city was inhabited by men and orcs, but the Witch King himself was originally Numenorean, so you might see some of that influence there as well.
  • Barad-dur: I wouldn’t recommend exploring Mordor or the ruins of Barad-dur, but they are technically an option.
  • Ruins with “evil influence”: remember Mount Gundabad and Dol Guldur

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SOURCES: A little bit of everything, but especially LotR, The Silmarillion, and The Unfinished Tales

aleksiskivi:

21474:

Nostalgiaa perkele.

Osa: 2

Osa: 3

Osa: 4

Osa: 5

MENO TOIJALAAN JOS PERSAUS KESTÄÄ

roachpatrol:

court-of-ocelot:

laureljupiter:

court-of-ocelot:

culturalrebel:

aka “Elitism is my middle name”

I like how Moffat would say that Reinette - a female character that he wrote into the show - is obviously a perfect match for the Doctor based on her level of ‘civilization’ and education.

As opposed to oh say…Rose Tyler - a lower-class girl who never went to university - whom the Doctor actually fell in love with and did settle down with in another universe.

This quote just has it all, doesn’t it?

- The elitism

- The dig at Rose Tyler and RTD, by extension

- The elevation of ‘his’ character at the expense of existing ones.

- The implication that Madame de Pompadour - one of the most powerful women in the country - would of course drop everything she had worked for to go and ‘settle down’ with a man who is basically a homeless spacehobo.

People who call Moffat a talentless hack are mistaken.  It takes some skill to cram that much fail into just three sentences.

Hah, excellent Moffat-criticism here. He is so petty, and so unequipped to write insightful sci-fi.

Like, okay, let’s pretend for a second that by “educated and civilised” he means “has a lot of knowledge and social insight” (which is a valid thing to look for in a romantic partner) rather than, you know, “rich, fancy and subservient” (which is what Moffat expects people to look for in a romantic partner).

… I really don’t think that an 18th century aristocrat has more understanding of science and society than a 21st person without A levels but with a working television. And in any case, if the Doctor was really looking for people who are Intellectual Equals, he’d surely look in the future, when people understand time travel, and have wikipedia installed in their brains, or whatever. Or AIs! I can’t imagine anyone more educated and ‘civilised’ than AI people!

Just, one thing I really loved about RTD’s Who arcs - which Moffat clearly didn’t understand at all - was that EVERYTHING the companions knew was useful - Harry Potter trivia! Game-show quickness! Fast typing! - and that the, like, real-world hierarchy of skills and marketability was always shown as less important than courage and compassion.

WITHOUT A LEVELS BUT WITH A WORKING TELEVISION

YES THIS.

I’m imagining the real Madame de Pompadour and how very unimpressed she would be by Steven Moffat declaring his ~admiration for her, but

wow

did this man just admit that he think the position of Companion is actually the Doctor’s maîtresse-en-titre?  Jesus wept.

That is exactly what this man thinks, and what he writes also. He thinks women are wired to ‘cling’ and men are wired to want to escape them, and the only way a relationship can be agreeable to both parties is if the woman accepts that they can only spend time together when the dude initiates it.

… Suddenly I am kinda surprised that Sherlock and Irene didn’t set up a long-distance relationship where she spends her days in an orientalist parody of a villa, waiting for Sherlock and passing the time taking luxurious bubble-baths and emotionlessly spanking female nobility.

Oh my god this is some sick shit— and really, really, really highlights how much Moffat doesn’t understand the fundamental heart of the show he’s fucking running. If the Doctor was so hot for intelligent, well educated, civilized women why the fuck did he ever leave his home planet? Why has he only ever had one Gallifreyan companion after he left his granddaughter to go her own way? Romana was foisted on him by the time lord ellimist, he didn’t go picking her out of a catalogue. 

The Doctor runs around with soldiers and schoolkids and teachers and sailors and students and journalists and shop girls and alien refugees and orphans and robot dogs and barbarians and private detective penguins and renegade archaeologists. If he wanted a slice of properly civilized girlfriend he had the whole universe to go pick one out from, and he never did till Moffat wrote him launching himself smooch-first at the lady in the fancy dress and historically inaccurate boobies.

Goddamn I am so mad. 

wtfevolution:

Honestly, sometimes evolution just gets a guy to do the noises. It’s reasonably sure no one can tell.

Source: “Newborn Mongolian saiga antelope with mother,” © BBC Natural History Unit and NHNZ Sounds, via Wildscreen Arkive

via: myfotolog
source: la-loops
tags: #e
creativedeep:

All rise! The Queen is here #bowdown @cheyennedepree

creativedeep:

All rise! The Queen is here #bowdown @cheyennedepree

8,240 plays

toastyhat:

(A short lyricstuck with Heroes and Thieves by Vanessa Carlton—started this a while back and thought I should finish the last three panels!)

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viria:

I’ve finally finished it!;_; I guess I just needed an excuse to draw a bunch of shirtless teenagers.

dancingspirals:

ironychan:

hungrylikethewolfie:

dduane:


A loaf of bread made in the first century AD, which was discovered at Pompeii, preserved for centuries in the volcanic ashes of Mount Vesuvius. The markings visible on the top are made from a Roman bread stamp, which bakeries were required to use in order to mark the source of the loaves, and to prevent fraud. (via Ridiculously Interesting)

(sigh) I’ve seen these before, but this one’s particularly beautiful.

I feel like I’m supposed to be marveling over the fact that this is a loaf of bread that’s been preserved for thousands of years, and don’t get me wrong, that’s hella cool.  But honestly, I’m mostly struck by the unexpected news that “bread fraud” was apparently once a serious concern.

Bread Fraud was a huge thing,  Bread was provided to the Roman people by the government - bakers were given grain to make the free bread, but some of them stole the government grain to use in other baked goods and would add various substitutes, like sawdust or even worse things, to the bread instead.  So if people complained that their free bread was not proper bread, the stamp told them exactly whose bakery they ought to burn down.

Bread stamps continued to be used at least until the Medieval period in Europe. Any commercially sold bread had to be stamped with an official seal to identify the baker to show that it complied with all rules and regulations about size, price, and quality. This way, rotten or undersized loaves could be traced back to the baker. Bakers could be pilloried, sent down the streets in a hurdle cart with the offending loaf tied around their neck, fined, or forbidden to engage in baking commercially ever again in that city. There are records of a baker in London being sent on a hurdle cart because he used an iron rod to increase the weight of his loaves, and another who wrapped rotten dough with fresh who was pilloried. Any baker hurdled three times had to move to a new city if they wanted to continue baking.
If you have made bread, you are probably familiar with a molding board. It’s a flat board used to shape the bread. Clever fraudsters came up with a molding board that had a little hole drilled into it that wasn’t easily noticed. A customer would buy his dough by weight, and then the baker would force some of that dough through the hole, so they could sell and underweight loaf and use the stolen dough to bake new loafs to sell. Molding boards ended up being banned in London after nine different bakers were caught doing this. There were also instances of grain sellers withholding grain to create an artificial scarcity drive up the price of that, and things like bread.
Bread, being one of the main things that literally everyone ate in many parts of the world, ended up with a plethora of rules and regulations. Bakers were probably no more likely to commit fraud than anyone else, but there were so many of them, that we ended up with lots and lots of rules and records of people being shifty.
Check out Fabulous Feasts: Medieval Cookery and Ceremony by Madeleine Pelner Cosman for a whole chapter on food laws as they existed in about 1400. Plus the color plates are fantastic.

dancingspirals:

ironychan:

hungrylikethewolfie:

dduane:

A loaf of bread made in the first century AD, which was discovered at Pompeii, preserved for centuries in the volcanic ashes of Mount Vesuvius. The markings visible on the top are made from a Roman bread stamp, which bakeries were required to use in order to mark the source of the loaves, and to prevent fraud. (via Ridiculously Interesting)

(sigh) I’ve seen these before, but this one’s particularly beautiful.

I feel like I’m supposed to be marveling over the fact that this is a loaf of bread that’s been preserved for thousands of years, and don’t get me wrong, that’s hella cool.  But honestly, I’m mostly struck by the unexpected news that “bread fraud” was apparently once a serious concern.

Bread Fraud was a huge thing,  Bread was provided to the Roman people by the government - bakers were given grain to make the free bread, but some of them stole the government grain to use in other baked goods and would add various substitutes, like sawdust or even worse things, to the bread instead.  So if people complained that their free bread was not proper bread, the stamp told them exactly whose bakery they ought to burn down.

Bread stamps continued to be used at least until the Medieval period in Europe. Any commercially sold bread had to be stamped with an official seal to identify the baker to show that it complied with all rules and regulations about size, price, and quality. This way, rotten or undersized loaves could be traced back to the baker. Bakers could be pilloried, sent down the streets in a hurdle cart with the offending loaf tied around their neck, fined, or forbidden to engage in baking commercially ever again in that city. There are records of a baker in London being sent on a hurdle cart because he used an iron rod to increase the weight of his loaves, and another who wrapped rotten dough with fresh who was pilloried. Any baker hurdled three times had to move to a new city if they wanted to continue baking.

If you have made bread, you are probably familiar with a molding board. It’s a flat board used to shape the bread. Clever fraudsters came up with a molding board that had a little hole drilled into it that wasn’t easily noticed. A customer would buy his dough by weight, and then the baker would force some of that dough through the hole, so they could sell and underweight loaf and use the stolen dough to bake new loafs to sell. Molding boards ended up being banned in London after nine different bakers were caught doing this. There were also instances of grain sellers withholding grain to create an artificial scarcity drive up the price of that, and things like bread.

Bread, being one of the main things that literally everyone ate in many parts of the world, ended up with a plethora of rules and regulations. Bakers were probably no more likely to commit fraud than anyone else, but there were so many of them, that we ended up with lots and lots of rules and records of people being shifty.

Check out Fabulous Feasts: Medieval Cookery and Ceremony by Madeleine Pelner Cosman for a whole chapter on food laws as they existed in about 1400. Plus the color plates are fantastic.